Revolving Energy Fund Projects

In fiscal year 2022, U-M began ramping up energy conservation projects funded by an initial $15 million investment from the revolving energy fund. Energy-efficient LED lighting upgrades in Ann Arbor, Dearborn, and Flint buildings comprise the majority of the projects.

LEDs can use 50% less energy than traditional fluorescent bulbs. Reducing energy consumption lowers the amount of energy the university needs to generate and procure, thus reducing operating costs and carbon emissions as we work to achieve carbon neutrality.

The Office of Campus Sustainability is supporting the work on the Ann Arbor campus, including the development of project proposals, financial management, data tracking, and project close-out. The projects themselves are managed in a variety of ways, including by AEC Construction Services, AEC Construction Management, and units that have contracted with external vendors.

The Planet Blue website provides high-level info about Flint and Dearborn projects.

Project timing and other details are evolving. We’ll update this page regularly.

Questions? Email  energyconservation@umich.edu.
Ann Arbor Campus Projects
LED Lighting Upgrades

Angell and Tisch Halls

Couzens Hall

Dow Building

Duderstadt Center

East Hall

East Quad

Francois-Xavier Bagnoud Building

GG Brown Building

Housing Parking Lots

Lorch Hall

Mason Hall

Michigan Memorial Phoenix Project Lab

Modern Languages Building

North Campus Research Complex Building 10

North Campus Research Complex Building 16

North Campus Research Complex Building 18

North Campus Research Complex Building 28

Randall Lab

Shapiro Library

Pump Upgrades

1100 North University Building

East Hall

LED Upgrade Frequently Asked Questions
LEDs can use 50% less energy than traditional fluorescent bulbs. Reducing energy consumption lowers the amount of energy the university needs to generate and procure, thus reducing operating costs and carbon emissions as we work to achieve carbon neutrality.

The initial round includes 50 projects on the Ann Arbor campus (across general fund, NCRC, and Student Life buildings) and on the Flint and Dearborn campuses.

The projects are funded by the university’s revolving energy fund.

Equity and project availability were the primary criteria. Development of a lighting upgrade project requires time and effort to audit older buildings (for which construction drawings may not exist or be accurate) to determine existing fixture types, lamp counts, costs, carbon emissions, and payback periods. Existing project proposals were included in this launch. Staff and students are currently working to develop new project proposals in many remaining buildings.

Internal and external construction crews.

The duration depends on the size of the building and the scope of work, ranging from weeks to months. Installers make an effort to cause as little disruption as possible, including – if feasible – doing the installation when a space is vacant. In addition, the periodic disruption of replacing burned-out bulbs will greatly diminish: LEDs have 60,000-hour expected life, which in a typical office could be 30 years! 

At the building level, coordinators determine when it’s easiest to work in each building and aim to schedule the installations during that time. For instance, classroom buildings are notably emptier during the summer. Some buildings are busy all year long, so there’s not always a perfect solution. At the room level, the facility manager guides day-to-day sequencing based on room usage. 



This first wave of LED lighting projects is focused on linear fluorescent tubes. These are the most common lamps on campus, the most popular choice for lighting fixtures from the mid-1980s to mid-2010s. Linear lamp replacements are proving to be the best investment today.  In coming years, we will return to the buildings and replace the remaining lamps with LEDs.



The color temperature of the LED lamps matches the existing fluorescent bulbs to produce a barely noticeable difference.

The old lamps and ballasts will be recycled. 

Questions about the program: energyconservation@umich.edu

Building-specific questions: Facility manager